Smashed Sweet Potatoes.

There are so many ways to cook vegetables, especially in fall time. It's so fun to bring in different herbs and to try to different styles of cooking.

smashed sweet potatoes / heirloomed

Sweet potatoes are so beautiful on the table this time of year but to be honest I'm not the biggest fan of that orange veggie texture (same with butternut squash, pumpkin and the likes). I wanted to share with you all my favorite way to cook and serve sweet potatoes as an alternative to the marshmallow topped soufflé  you might be accustomed to for Thanksgiving. The slicing makes a pretty presentation and the rosemary and pine nuts add a toasty, fall flavor that is great for an everyday meal or a holiday gathering. 

smashed sweet potatoes / heirloomed
smashed sweet potatoes / heirloomed

SMASHED SWEET POTATOES

  • 3 TBSP Olive oil
  • 2 large springs fresh Rosemary
  • 1/2 cup toasted pine nuts
  • 3 large Sweet potatoes
  • 1/2 tsp Kosher salt

Peel, cut into slices. Drizzle olive oil, kosher salt, rough chopped rosemary. Bake at 375 until they start to brown, approximately 25 minutes. In a dry pan toast pine nuts until they begin to turn brown, tossing constantly. Smash slices with a potato masher, drizzle with a bit more olive oil and toss with pine nut + a bit more chopped rosemary. Enjoy!

smashed sweet potatoes / heirloomed
smashed sweet potatoes / heirloomed
smashed sweet potatoes / heirloomed
smashed sweet potatoes / heirloomed

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smashed sweet potatoes / heirloomed

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heirloomed is a lifestyle brand with a mission of "keeping heirlooms around for another generation." Our blog features stories about family recipes, creating traditions with your family, interior design and entertaining by mixing new and vintage pieces, classic style, and small town + historic travel. Our shop features a collection of "goods inspired by the past, for generations to enjoy" with an array of products and meaningful gifts including linen apronstabletop linensartceramics and beyond. Learn more at www.heirloomedcollection.com

Turkey Gravy.

Making gravy is one of my favorite parts of Thanksgiving season, because ... gravy. It smells so delicious as it cooks, and it adds such a special, classic flavor to Thanksgiving dinner. I can't imagine my meal without it, and especially love it on stuffing, beans + for dipping biscuits into. OK, pretty much on everything.

Below you'll find my simple recipe and tips for making Turkey Gravy. Check out our "How To" post on making a roux for more tips on making this recipe as perfectly as possible. If you're not making a turkey yourself, I've also heard the Williams Sonoma Gravy Base is a wonderful alternative to homemade drippings.

turkey gravy / heirloomed

TURKEY GRAVY

  • 1/2 cup butter, cut into 8 pieces
  • 1 teaspoon coarse black pepper
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 4 cups turkey drippings 

To begin, you need to capture your turkey drippings. Pour drippings from your turkey pan into a fine mesh strainer to allow them to cool a bit. You'll see the fat rise to the top and start to solidify. Once this happens, use a spoon to remove the fat. Do this until you have the 4 cups of drippings. Set aside. 

In a large saucepan, melt 1/2 cup butter over medium-low heat, and sprinkle in the black pepper. Slowly add in the flour, constantly whisking to combine (this is where the roux post comes in handy). After a few minutes, the flour and butter will be incorporated, making a paste. Pour your drippings into the pan, continuing to whisk.  Allow the gravy to cook for a few minutes in order to thicken. Serve immediately, or keep on very low heat until ready to serve. Enjoy!


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turkey gravy / heirloomed

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heirloomed is a lifestyle brand with a mission of "keeping heirlooms around for another generation." Our blog features stories about family recipes, creating traditions with your family, interior design and entertaining by mixing new and vintage pieces, classic style, and small town + historic travel. Our shop features a collection of "goods inspired by the past, for generations to enjoy" with an array of products and meaningful gifts including linen apronstabletop linensartceramics and beyond. Learn more at www.heirloomedcollection.com

Leftover Cranberry Ice Cream Topping.

While I don't generally love leftovers all that much, one of my favorite things about Roasted Cranberries for Thanksgiving is enjoying them the day after. They're a perfect post-Thanksgiving treat atop vanilla ice cream.

Roasted Cranberries and ice cream

The tart flavor combines so deliciously with the sweetness of the vanilla ice cream and the crunch of the pecans. A sprinkle of salt can top it off to add the perfect balance of flavor. This just might be my new favorite way to enjoy cranberries (surprise, surprise!)

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Cranberries and ice cream thanksgiving

I'd love to hear your favorite day-after use for your leftovers. #HEIRLOOMED


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Roasted Cranberries after Thanksgiving Pinterest

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heirloomed is a lifestyle brand with a mission of "keeping heirlooms around for another generation." Our blog features stories about family recipes, creating traditions with your family, interior design and entertaining by mixing new and vintage pieces, classic style, and small town + historic travel. Our shop features a collection of "goods inspired by the past, for generations to enjoy" with an array of products and meaningful gifts including linen apronstabletop linensartceramics and beyond. Learn more at www.heirloomedcollection.com

Day-After Thanksgiving Turkey Sandwich.

There's really nothing better than a turkey sandwich the day after the Thanksgiving feast. All you need is some grainy bread, your leftover turkey slices, cranberry sauce and lots of Duke's Mayo. The mayo makes the sandwich, if you ask me. (P.S. happy 100th anniversary to Duke's Mayo!)

turkey sandwich day after thanksgiving
Day after thanksgiving sandwich
Turkey sandwich duke's mayo thanksgiving anniversary

I also love turkey with stuffing on bread, drizzled with gravy. How do you like your turkey the day after? #HEIRLOOMED


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thanksgiving turkey sandwich day after duke's mayo pinterest

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heirloomed is a lifestyle brand with a mission of "keeping heirlooms around for another generation." Our blog features stories about family recipes, creating traditions with your family, interior design and entertaining by mixing new and vintage pieces, classic style, and small town + historic travel. Our shop features a collection of "goods inspired by the past, for generations to enjoy" with an array of products and meaningful gifts including linen apronstabletop linensartceramics and beyond. Learn more at www.heirloomedcollection.com

How to : Make a Roux

Roux is one of those mysterious things that few people know how to make these days. Not because it's necessarily difficult, but because it isn't often taught, or even thought of when it comes to cooking in the everyday kitchen. 

That's why it's important to me to talk about the basics of making a roux, because it can be such a great addition to everyday meals and a way to enhance recipes you already love. Plus, learning how to master long-standing kitchen techniques is one of my favorite things, and part of what heirloomed is all about.

This post is part of our "Made from Scratch" series, where we focus on the mastering the basics that it takes to make the classics from scratch - because things just taste better that way.

how to make a roux / heirloomed
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Roux comes in many forms: white, brown, medium-brown, dark-brown, and variations of these. The roux I made was white to blond, but there are plenty of uses for darker roux, as you'll read below. 

ROUX 

  • Butter
  • Flour

In a pan, melt butter to a bubble. Add in an amount of flour equal to your chosen portion of butter - for example, 2 tbs butter, 2 tbs flour. Stir the flour and butter together with a fork or whisk until thickened. For a white roux - often used to thicken sauces - that's approximately 2 to 5 minutes. For a blond roux, often used in soups, cook until it smells a bit "toasty" - usually 5 to 10 minutes. A medium-brown roux takes 15 to 30 minutes, and a dark brown roux takes 30 to 45 minutes. Both medium and dark-brown roux is used in making most gumbos. 

how to make a roux / heirloomed
how to make a roux / heirloomed

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heirloomed is a lifestyle brand with a mission of "keeping heirlooms around for another generation." Our blog features stories about family recipes, creating traditions with your family, interior design and entertaining by mixing new and vintage pieces, classic style, and small town + historic travel. Our shop features a collection of "goods inspired by the past, for generations to enjoy" with an array of products and meaningful gifts including linen apronstabletop linensartceramics and beyond. Learn more at www.heirloomedcollection.com